0

George Samuel Clason: The Richest Man in Babylon Book Summary


  • A part of all you earn is yours to keep.
  • The eons of time have crumbled to dust the proud walls of its temples, but the wisdom of Babylon endures.
  • Money is the medium by which earthly success is measured.
  • Money makes possible the enjoyment of the best the earth affords.
  • Money is plentiful for those who understand the simple laws which govern its acquisition. Money is governed today by the same laws which controlled it when prosperous men thronged the streets of Babylon, six thousand years ago.

 

Seven Cures for a lean purse

  • 1) Start thy purse to fattening
  • 2) Control thy expenditures
  • 3) Make thy gold multiply
  • 4) Guard thy treasures from loss
  • 5) Make of thy dwelling a profitable investment
  • 6) Insure a future income
  • 7) Increase thy ability to earn

 

Success means accomplishments as the result of our own efforts and abilities. Proper preparation is the key to our success. Our acts can be no wiser than our thoughts. Our thinking can be no wiser than our understanding.

  • Income, that is the thing.
  • It costs nothing to ask wise advice.
  • If you have not acquired more than a bare existence in the years since we were youths, it is cause you either have failed to learn the laws that govern the building of wealth, or else you do not observe them.
  • She makes wanton spenders, who soon dissipate all they receive and are left beset by overwhelming appetites and desires they have not the ability to gratify.
  • Wealth is a power. With wealth many things are possible.
  • I decided that if i was to achieve what I desired, time and study would be required.
  • As for time, all men have it abundance.
  • As for study, did not our wise teacher teach us that learning was of two kinds: the one kind begin the things we learned and knew, and the other being the training that taught us how to find out what we did not know.
  • When youth comes to age for advice he receives the wisdom of years.
  • The sun that shines today is the sun hat shone when thy father was born, and will still be shining when thy last grandchild shall pass into the darkness.
  • The wisdom of age is like the fixed stars that shine so unchanged that the sailor may depend upon them to steer his course.
  • I found the road to wealth when i decided that a part of all I earned was mine to keep. And so will you.
  • You pay to everyone but yourself.
  • You labor for others.
  • Every gold piece you save is a slave to work for you.
  • What you save must earn.
  • MEN OF ACTION ARE FAVORED BY THE GODDESS OF GOOD LUCK
  • A part of all you earn is yours to keep. It should be not less than a tenth no matter how little you earn. It can be as much more as you can afford. Pay yourself first.
  • Wealth, like a tree, grows from a tiny seed. The first copper you save is the seed from which your tree of wealth shall grow. The sooner you plant that seed the sooner shall the tree grow. And the more faithfully you nourish and water that tree with consistent savings, the sooner may you bask in contentment beneath its shade.
  • Advice is one thing that is freely given away, but watch that you take only what is worth having.
  • You first learned to live upon less than you could earn. Next you learned to seek advice from those who were competent through their own experiences to give it. And, lastly, you have learned to make gold work for you.
  • My sons think only of spending and give no thought to
  • Opportunity is a haughty goddess who wastes no time with those who are unprepared.
  • Will power is but the unflinching purpose to carry a task you set for yourself to fulfilment.
  • Wealth grows wherever men exert energy.
  • Wealth grows in magic ways.
  • A part of all I earn is mine to keep.
  • A small return and a safe one is far more desirable than risk.
  • Enjoy life while you are here.
  • Life is good and life is rich with things worthwhile and things to enjoy.
  • A part of all you earn is yours to keep.
  • By taking advantage of opportunities available to all.
  • Only a great desire for wealth.
  • That which one man knows can be taught to others.
  • Truth is always simple.
  • Lean purse: ‘For each ten coins i put in, to spend but nine.
  • All men are burdened with more desires than they can gratify.
  • Therefore, engrave upon the clay each thing for which thou desireth to spend. Select those that are necessary and others that are possible through the expenditure of nineteenths of thy income. Cross out the rest and consider them but a part of that great multitude of desires that must go unsatisfied and regret them not.
  • Budget then thy necessary expenses.
  • The purpose of a budget is to help thy purse to fatten. It is to assist thee to have thy necessities and, insofar as attainable, thy other desires. It is to enable thee to realize thy most cherished desires by defending them from thy casual wishes. Like a bright light in a dark cave thy budget shows up the leaks from thy purse and enables thee to stop them and control thy expenditures for definite and gratifying purposes.
  • Budget thy expenses that thou mayest have coins to pay for thy necessities, to pay for thy enjoyments and to gratify thy worthwhile desires without spending more than nine-tenths of thy earnings.
  • To put each coin to labouring that it may reproduce its kind even as the flocks of the field and help bring to thee income, a stream of wealth that shall flow constantly into thy purse.
  • Thus it is wise that we must first secure small amounts and learn to protect them before the gods entrust us with larger.
  • Every owner of gold is tempted by opportunities.
  • Be not misled by thine own romantic desires to make wealth rapidly.
  • Therefore, do I advise thee from the wisdom of my experiences: be not too confident of thine own wisdom in entrusting thy treasures to the possible pitfalls of investments. Better by far to consult the wisdom of those experienced in handling money for profit. Such advice is freely given for the asking and may readily possess a value equal in gold to the sum thou considerest investing. In truth, such is its actual value if it save thee from loss.
  • This, then is the forth cure for a lean purse, and of great importance if it prevent thy purse from being emptied once it has become well filled. Guard treasure from loss by investing only where thy principal is safe, where it may be reclaimed if desirable, and where thou will not fail to collect a fair rental. Consult with wise men. Secure the advice of those experiences in the profitable handling of gold. Let their wisdom protect thy treasure from unsafe investments.
  • Thus come many blessings to the man who owneth his own house. And greatly will it reduce his cost of living, making available more of his earnings for pleasures and the gratification of his ideas. This, then, is the fifth cure for a lean purse: Own thy own home.
  • Provide in advance for the needs of thy growing age and the protection of thy family.
  • Strong desire to earn more.
  • Preceding accomplishment must be desire. Thy desires must be strong and definite. General desires are but weak longings. For a man to wish to be rich is of little purpose.
  • This is the process by which wealth is accumulated: first in small sums, then in larger ones as a man learns and becomes more capable.
  • Desires must be simple and definite. They defeat their own purpose should they be too many, too confusing, or beyond a man’s training to accomplish.
  • The more of wisdom we know, the more we may earn. That man who seeks to learn more of his craft shall be richly rewarded.
  • Always do the affairs of man change and improve because keen-minded men seek greater skill that they may better serve those upon whose patronage they depend. Therefore, i urge all men to be in the front rank of progress and not to stand still, lest they be left behind.
  • He must pay his debts with all the promptness within his power, not purchasing that for which he is unable to pay.
  • He must take care of his family that they may think and speak well of him.
  • He must make a will of record that, in case the gods call him, proper and honourable division of his property be accomplished.
  • He must have compassion upon those who are injured and smitten by misfortune and aid them within reasonable limits. He must do deeds of thoughtfulness to those dear to him.
  • Thus the seventh and last remedy for a lean purse is to cultivate thy own powers, to study and become wiser, to become more skilful, to so act as to respect thyself. Thereby shalt thou acquire confidence in thy self to achieve thy carefully considered desires.
  • There is abundance for all.
  • An instinct common to most men, the love of taking a chance with a small amount of silver in the hope of winning much gold.
  • The game is so arranged that it will always favour the keeper.
  • It not good luck but a just reward for our efforts.
  • Opportunity waits for no man. Today it is here; soon it is gone. Therefore, delay not!
  • The spirit of procrastination is within all men. We desire riches; yet, how often when opportunity doth appear before us, that spirit of procrastination from within doth urge various delays in our acceptance. In listening to it we do become our own worst enemies.
  • A habit of needles delaying where action was required, action prompt and decisive.
  • To attract good luck to oneself, it is necessary to take advantage of opportunities.
  • Good luck follows opportunity.
  • Good luck can be enticed by accepting opportunity.
  • Action will lead thee forward to the successes thou dost desire.

 

The five laws of gold

  • 1) Gold cometh gladly and in increasing quantity to any man who will put by not less than one-tenth of his earning to create an estate for his future and that of his family.
  • 2) Gold laboreth diligently and contentedly for the wise owner who finds for it profitable employment, multiplying even as the flocks of the field.
  • 3) Gold clingeth to the protection of the cautious owner who invests it under the advice of men wise in its handling.
  • 4) Gold slippeth away from the man who invest it in businesses or purpose with which he is not familiar or which are not approved by those skilled in its keep.
  • 5) Gold flees the man who would force it to impossible earnings or who followeth the alluring advice of tricksters and schemers or who trusts it to his own inexperience and romantic desires in investment.
  • Wealth that comes quickly goeth the same way.
  • Wealth that stayeth to give enjoyment and satisfaction to its owner comes gradually, because it is a child born of knowledge and persistent purpose.
  • The more gold i accumulate, the more readily it comes to me and in increased quantities. The gold which i save earns more, even as yours will, and its earnings earn more.
  • Better a little caution than a great regret.
  • We cannot afford to be without adequate protection.
  • The hungrier one becomes, the clearer one’s mind works- also the more sensitive one becomes to the odours of food.
  • Being young and without experience. I did not know that he who spends more than he earns is sowing the winds of needless self-indulgence from which he is sure to reap the whirlwinds of trouble and humiliation.
  • What every woman longs for is to be desired.
  • Have I the soul of a slave or the soul of a free man.
  • My debts were my enemies.
  • The soul of a free man looks at life as a series of problems to be solved and solves them, while the soul of a slave whines, ‘What can I do who am but a slave?’
  • Where the determination is, the way can be found.
  • The man who keepeth in his purse both gold and silver that he need not spend is good to his family and loyal to his king. The man who hath but a few coppers in his purse is indifferent to his family and indifferent to his king. But the man who hath naught in his purse is unkind to his family and is disloyal to his king, for his own heart is bitter. Therefore, the man who wisheth to achieve must have coin that he may keep to jingle in his purse, that he have in his heart love for his family and loyalty to his king.
  • Life is rich with many pleasures for men to enjoy.

 

To buy the book, click the link in the image below to purchase from Amazon

 

 

Leave a Reply

Scroll to top